Recycled Paper: Pencils

December 6th, 2010 - 
Write with style! Great pencils ideal for gift!! Comes with 2 piece of paper pencils, all in black lead. Take an active part in saving the Earth and recycle! Size : 165×7 mm. Design & Made in Korea.
 















Molo design paper softseating – recycled paper furniture

December 6th, 2010 - 
 

Molo Designs’s Paper Softseating is made of kraft paper – a stiff, robust unbleached paper that is 100% recyclable and is constructed of 50% recycled fiber. Each piece of furniture has magnetic ends so similar pieces can be strung together into larger geometric shapes. Very, very cool looking. Longterm use is said to give the Very, very cool looking. Longterm use is said to give the furniture a lovely patina. No smoking please.

Paper

December 6th, 2010 - 
 

Paper is separated into the following groups: 

Magazines
Newspapers
Office paper
Cardboard
Phone directories

– Deposit used paper at your local recycling bank.
– Most home recycling bins, provided by your local council, usually accept paper products.
– Only recycle gummed paper if specified, such as envelopes and stickers.
– Reduce paper waste by canceling unwanted deliveries, or read news online as opposed to buying newspapers.

– Put a “no junk mail please” sign on your letter box to reduce unwanted deliveries.
Reuse paper around the home as scrap paper or packing material. Envelopes can also be reused.
– Set your printer to print on both sides of the paper.
– Buy recycled paper whenever possible.

Composting

December 6th, 2010 - 
 

Composting is an excellent way to recycle kitchen and garden waste. It is very easy to build your own compost bin and use the compost to help your garden grow.

How Composting Works
Composting is the decomposition of materials that originated from animals and plants. These organic materials can be things such as plant trimmings, vegetable cuttings, eggshells and teabags. The composting process produces a dark, crumbly matter that can be used as fertilizer in garden soil. The main stages of composting are:

– Adding organic materials to a compost bin
– Micro-organisms, such as bacteria and fungi, break sown the soft material.
– This causes the compost pile to heat to around 60°C. This is the ideal temperature for micro-organisms to work at.
– The compost pile then cools to below 30°C.
Small creatures such as worms and insects then break down the tougher material.
– The whole process usually takes about 3 – 9 months, and results in a nutrient-rich fertiliser to use in your garden.

– The compost that is ready to use can be taken from the bottom of the pile, leaving the rest to finish the process.

 
How to Build a Compost Bin
– You can buy a compost bin or build your own. Compost bins are usually sold at DIY and gardening stores.
– Build a compost bin by creating a frame out of wood and attach it to the ground using posts.
– Your compost bin should be able to hold about 200-300 liters, try and use a bin with a lid to keep out the rain.
– The compost bin should be placed in a well-lit and well-drained area of the garden.
– Try and keep the compost bin out of the wind.
– Improve drainage by breaking up the soil underneath the compost bin.
What You Should and Shouldn’t Compost

What TO ADD to your compost pile:
Hair and fur
Shredded paper
Straw and hay
Animal bedding and sawdust
Crushed egg shells
Grass and plant cuttings
Raw fruit and vegetable trimmings
Teabags and coffee granules
Horse manure
Leaves
What NOT TO ADD to your compost pile:
Meat or fish
Coal Ash
Animal waste
Nappies and used tissues
Dairy products
Cooked foods
Colored or treated paper
Chemically treated wood
Diseased plants
Persistent weeds

10 Ways to Consume Less Energy_part 1

December 6th, 2010 - 
Changing a few of the things that you take for granted like how you go about your daily routine can add to the benefits of using green energy. It may not seem like much at first, but the accumulation of your efforts over the span of a year and over the span of your lifetime will become a mountain of difference to the planet. Consider if everyone were to make these small changes, the impact would be widespread and noticeable almost right away. A relatively minuscule amount of sacrifice is all it takes and you’ll barely notice any difference in how you take on your day to day rituals.

1. Take shorter showers:
Shortening your shower by a mere 2-3 minutes will save money on water of course, but you’ll also be affecting how much water your utility has to treat and how much your tank has to heat thereby saving energy.

2. Turn off lights and appliances: This is one you’re folks have been preaching for years, but keeping lights and appliances off when they’re not needed is the single easiest way to save energy and save on the environment.

3. Switch to Energy Efficient appliances and light bulbs: A great program that has been around for some time now, EnergyStar rated appliances use 10-50% less energy and/or water then their inefficient counterparts. There are several different types of high-efficiency light bulbs out there now, so do a little research to find what type is right for your home.4. Thermostat settings = $$$: Set your thermostat 2-3 degrees warmer for the AC in the summer, and 4-5 degrees cooler in the winter. This adjustment may be one of the more difficult ones to make, but it also makes the largest impact in energy/money savings. Wear more cloths in the winter, and less in the summer is my best advice. Muscle through this one and you’re on your way to really making a difference.
4. Thermostat settings = $$$: Set your thermostat 2-3 degrees warmer for the AC in the summer, and 4-5 degrees
cooler in the winter. This adjustment may be one of the more difficult ones to make, but it also makes the largest impact in energy/money savings. Wear more cloths in the winter, and less in the summer is my best advice. Muscle through this one and you’re on your way to really making a difference.
 
5. Wash larger loads of laundry: Some people are very particular about how and when they wash their clothes, and some people just heap it all together like it doesn’t matter. Well, it’s you heapers that are the environmental helpers. Washing larger loads means you do it less often, which means you use less resources (water/power/time). Not only should you wash more clothes less often, but do it with cold water, and only use only eco-friendly detergents that come in recyclable containers.