How can you reuse bread bags?

July 4th, 2011 - 

Bread bags are made from low-density polyethylene. So it’s plastic. You could put them in the special containers for recycling plastic or you could simply reuse the bags at home, in your household. I remember my grandma being ecologically by mistake:) and using a plastic bag for several years and in different situations: she packed my sandwhiches for school or prepare some bags to store for the winter, in the fridge.
She also used plastic bags to fill them with cream and decorate cakes. But rearding this issue, I found much more over the internet: a plastic bag you could use instead of gloves, as a car travel rubbish or sick bag, as a pick up pet
droppings or irrigate plants just by making holes in it. What other innovative ways could we find together?

Via here.

Shower mat idea to make out of recycled wine corks

July 4th, 2011 - 
 

Maybe your already know Danny Seo. For those who do not know him, he is a  green living expert that shares in his best-selling books, television programs, products, magazine columns and his how-to lifestyle lectures – a lot of eco friendly ideas he has. This time, all you need is a box that you could paint in any color and a lot of wine corks – about 500 as Danny says.
For sure, you are having a lot of corks from your bottles and instead of wasting them, it is better to reuse them for your new bath mat. Glue is not needed because you will add as many corks as needed and they will keep their position
because of the tension between each one of them. If you do not have so many corks, I am sure there are a lot of restaurants in the nearby that could help you will your bags:) What are your ideas for upcycling wine corks?

Via here.

Torresol Energy’s Gemasolar : Solar Power Plant

July 4th, 2011 - 

Torresol Energy’s Gemasolar is located in the Spanish province of Andalucia. Gemasolar was launched in May 2011 and it functions due to a solar salt battery that allows the system to make the most of the sun power long after the sunset. These batteries  consists of two tanks of molten salt thermal energy storage that allows the solar plant to generate on-demand electricity: a storage for days when it is raining or there are lots of clouds.
The  Molten salt energy storage (MSES) or “solar salt” batteries use potassium and sodium nitrate. These substances are much more safe and for sure cheap than other batteries. Compared to other batteries, Gemasolar  has
just doubled the availability of the batteries for 15 hours, almost double than others before. Gemasolar ’s expected production is 110,000 MWh per year—or about enough to fully power 25,000 households. Via
here.

Edible dresses made from fruits and vegetables

July 4th, 2011 - 

Fashion today goes beyond the limitis. It is not only about style, colors and status but about materials also. And these days, the designers thought of an edible collection of dresses made out of fruits and vegetables, chocolate and caramel, cake or jelley and also others that you can not even imagine.

Greendiary get together a collection of 26 pictures showing luxurious wearable designs that can be eaten at the end of the show. I really find inspiring some of them – see the first picture added in my post: I think the patterns could be
really interesting as an inspiring starting point for any fashion collection or work of art.

Sweaters made from recycled dog hair

July 4th, 2011 - 
An interesting how-to idea of recycling: collect your dog hair and  convert it into nice sweaters, scarfs, hats or vests. You could save money, material and also go green. The dog hair is combined with natural wool to be knitted in these pieces of clothing. In fact, this idea is not very new: it was used by the Eskimos for the centuries.


The studies proove that the dog’s hair is about 80% warmer than wool. The best hair is provided by breeds such as Newfoundlands, Chow Chows, Samoyed, Norwegian Elkhounds.

What is important is that when coats get wet, they will not have the smell of a wet dog. There are special books where you can read all about managing with dog’s hair: Kendall Crolius, “Knitting With Dog Hair: Better A Sweater From A Dog You Know and Love Than From A Sheep You’ll Never Meet”. What do you think about this? Would you wear sweaters made from recycled dog hair? Via here.